The Blogora: The Rhetoric Society of America
the profession

 

The State of Communication Scholarship


Submitted by syntaxfactory on July 29, 2013 - 8:00am


Via: http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2013/07/29/essay-state-communication...

Observers of the field regularly point to several stubborn failures:

Comparing scholarly citations across fields, communication is a net importer of new, generative ideas; it rarely exports them to other fields.

The absence of a commonly accepted core of methods and theories undercuts its rigor and intellectual utility.

Practitioners in government, the private sector and nonprofits rarely draw on communication scholars for advice, nor their scholarship to inform their work.

 

Adjunctification


Submitted by syntaxfactory on July 15, 2013 - 6:59am


On Facebook, I have recently had an awkward exchange. It stems from the realization that I am working harder this summer, in many ways, than I ever did before tenure. I am working without stress, but I am working nonetheless.

So, I foolishly expressed some desire to be more like my colleagues who are adjuncts -- most of whom do not pick up admin and service, much less research, work over the summer. What was genuinely naive about this statement, I think, is that I didn't recognize the diversity of human experience of adjunct labor. So let me start with that.

...

 

Lessons from the ALA (American Library Association: Partnerships


Submitted by syntaxfactory on July 1, 2013 - 11:51pm


So Kate and I went to the American Library Association meeting in Chicago this weekend.

 

Adjunctification


Submitted by syntaxfactory on June 26, 2013 - 8:29am


This piece:
http://chronicle.com/article/Im-an-Adjunct-Not-a/139969/
...embarrasses my profession.

The author is full time faculty at one school and adjunct at another. They complain that, as an adjunct, they have no obligation to write letters of rec, serve on committees, etc. They refuse to do this work because they want to resist the "adjunctification" of the university.

But -- by deciding to be an adjunct gig, while holding a tenured position elsewhere, they are surely only reinforcing that adjunctification.

 

Broken Peer Review


Submitted by syntaxfactory on June 1, 2013 - 12:36am


FROM: Peer-review practices of psychological journals: The fate of published articles, submitted again
Douglas P. Petersa1* and Stephen J. Cecia2

A growing interest in and concern about the adequacy and fairness of modern peer-review practices in publication and funding are apparent across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Although questions about reliability, accountability, reviewer bias, and competence have been raised, there has been very little direct research on these variables.

 

Lecture on Getting an Academic Job:


Submitted by syntaxfactory on May 24, 2013 - 8:07am


Lecture on Getting an Academic Job:
http://www.davidschmidtz.com/videos/deserving-succeed

Among the best points:
1. Fear of failure will make you #3 in every search
2. Prioritizing comparative success will diminish your work
3. Your success (or lack thereof) is not a crisis for your academic advisor.

I admit, #3 makes me apprehensive -- I'm not there yet, and I only advise BA and MA students.

--db

 

Jeff Rice breaks down the Job Search


Submitted by syntaxfactory on May 22, 2013 - 11:00pm


Jeff Rice breaks down the Job Search
http://ydog.net/?p=1758

REQUIRED READING

 

Gender Bias in Review of Abstracts in Comm


Submitted by syntaxfactory on May 8, 2013 - 6:50am


From: http://michaeljfaris.tumblr.com/post/49917671484/gender-bias-found-in-ho...
and from http://ninja-suffragette.tumblr.com/post/47688300493/gender-bias-found-i...
Original release here: http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/matilda.htm

This almost hurts to read.

...

“The participants were reading abstracts of 150 words or so and rating their quality. The author names were not displayed prominently and the grad students probably barely glanced at them -- but still they had this effect,” Knobloch-Westerwick said.

 

Survival Rates in PhD


Submitted by syntaxfactory on May 5, 2013 - 4:02am


Via NewAPPS:

anyone else notice these correlations?
by Jon Cogburn

"During my five or six years in graduate school two pretty strong correlations held up: (1) married students (at least the majority whose spouses were not academics) who did not have children were much less likely to complete the PhD than unmarried students, (2) married students with children were much more likely to complete the PhD than unmarried students."

Does this blogger's anecdotal experience seem generalizable to you?

 

Self-Sabotage in the Academic Career


Submitted by syntaxfactory on April 30, 2013 - 9:34am


See: http://chronicle.com/article/Self-Sabotage-in-the-Academic/138875/

Self-Sabotage in the Academic Career
15 ways in which faculty members harm their own futures, often without knowing it
By Robert J. Sternberg