The Blogora: The Rhetoric Society of America

 

Tenure and Privilege


Submitted by syntaxfactory on January 1, 2014 - 11:14am


Via a colleague on Facebook: http://theprofessorisin.com/2014/01/01/how-the-tenured-are-to-the-job-ma...

This blog entry makes a reasonable case that tenure functions in the way that white privilege does:

 

Why I Dress So Badly (Not Really): The Red Sneakers Effect


Submitted by syntaxfactory on December 26, 2013 - 8:12pm


FROM: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/currency/2013/12/the-power-of-the-...

"How is nonconformity interpreted by others? Do we see it as a sign of status? New research, to be published next near in The Journal of Consumer Research, suggests that we do. The authors call the phenomenon the “red sneakers effect,” after one of them taught a class at Harvard Business School in her red Converse.

 

RIP, Cohen


Submitted by syntaxfactory on December 25, 2013 - 8:12pm


Herman Cohen December 29, 1924 December 22, 2013 Herman Cohen, 88, of State College, died Sunday, December 22, 2013, at Nazareth Hospital, Philadelphia. Born December 29, 1924, in Superior, Nebraska, he was the son of the late Morris and Dora Shvartsman Cohen. In 1947, he married Marlee Hollander who survives in State College. He is also survived by two children, Bob Cohen and his wife, Regina, of Medford, NJ, Matthew Cohen, of Santa Clarita, CA; a brother, Edward Cohen and his wife, Phyllis, of Ocala, FL; and four grandchildren, Bobby, Sara, Kristina and Jennifer Cohen.

 

Alone on the Holidays


Submitted by syntaxfactory on December 25, 2013 - 12:09pm


The following is taken from a Guardian essay by John Berger, expressing the beauty of what must be done alone, and the comfort of what can be done together:

"[Degas] expresses the solitude being felt by a part of a limb or torso, which is accustomed to company, to being touched by fellow parts, but which when dancing has to go it alone. The darknesses express the pain of such a disconjuncture and the endurance necessary for bridging it...

 

Theory, Culture & Society Online Table of Contents Alert


Submitted by syntaxfactory on December 25, 2013 - 10:59am


Remember, it's always Christmas at the Blogora -- TOCs and CFPS several times a week via feeds on the left. --db

A new issue of Theory, Culture & Society is available online:
January 2014; Vol. 31, No. 1

The below Table of Contents is available online at: http://tcs.sagepub.com/content/vol31/issue1/?etoc

Articles
The Fate of the Dramatic in Modern Society: Social Theory and the Theatrical Avant-Garde
Jeffrey C Alexander
Theory, Culture & Society 2014;31 3-24
http://tcs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/31/1/3

The Virtues of Violence: The Salafi-Jihadi Political Universe

 

Barry Brummett has been named Honorary Director of the new Rhetorical Criticism Research Center of Shanghai University


Submitted by syntaxfactory on December 22, 2013 - 10:42pm


Rumor has it that Barry Brummett has been named Honorary Director of the new Rhetorical Criticism Research Center of Shanghai University. Congrats, Barry. After I A Richards, you are now the second most important rhetorician to reach out to China.

 

Midcareer


Submitted by syntaxfactory on December 19, 2013 - 10:14am


I am missing Jim Aune again. Some of it is because of the time of year, some of it is because the deadlines for the special issue I am co-editing with David Gore on his work are screeching toward me, some of it is because I desperately miss interacting with him in the Blogora. I always imagined that I was the part of the Blogora that reflected _Lingua Franca_, the magazine of academic life that I read as a grad student -- professional news, professional issues.

 

...the largest circle of those who claim to understand one another...


Submitted by syntaxfactory on December 18, 2013 - 1:46pm


Wayne Booth, via FB: "Perhaps the largest circle of those who claim to understand one another would be found in English and other modern language studies. Hundreds of thousands of us profess to understand just about anything that falls into our hands. But when we look more closely at humanistic claims to membership in large circles of understanding, they appear pretty feeble. After all, in the quantitative and mathematical sciences, people tend to recognize when they have not understood one another. But we students of the human tend to think we have understood when we have not."