The Blogora: The Rhetoric Society of America

 

"Writing is constituted by a rejection of all other forms of language"


Submitted by syntaxfactory on April 6, 2015 - 5:11pm


From: https://books.google.com/books?id=OVKrAgAAQBAJ
How to Live Together: Novelistic Simulations of Some Everyday Spaces
Roland Barthes
Columbia University Press, Jan 8, 2013

"Writing is constituted by a rejection of all other forms of language." (x)

 

Three Questions with Fred Johnson


Submitted by John W. Pell on April 3, 2015 - 4:58pm


Fred Johnson's essay "Perspicuous Objects" appeared in the Fall issue of Kairos (http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/19.1/topoi/johnson/index.html). The essay, or rather, the "piece" was an engaging argument about the use of comics in the instruction of both writing and critical theory. Beyond being an engaging argument, "Perspicuous Objects" also seamlessly melds new media with academic argumentation, providing readers with a glimpse of what is possible when scholarship is composed and crafted with digital mediums for consumption in digital environments.

 

Principles for the Postsecondary Teaching of Writing


Submitted by syntaxfactory on April 3, 2015 - 7:44am


Principles for the Postsecondary Teaching of Writing

Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), October 1989, Revised November 2013, Revised March 2015

http://www.ncte.org/cccc/resources/positions/postsecondarywriting

 

Program Profiles in Composition Forum


Submitted by syntaxfactory on April 2, 2015 - 3:21pm


Program Profiles in Composition Forum

 

Free e-book: Hybrid: The History and Science of Plant Breeding


Submitted by syntaxfactory on April 1, 2015 - 12:23pm


Dismayed by shrink-wrapped, Styrofoam-packed supermarket fruits and vegetables? Yearn for genetically natural produce, untouched by biotech manipulation? Sorry to say, thou yearnest in vain. As Noel Kingsbury shows in our free e-book for April, Hybrid: The History and Science of Plant Breeding, all of our produce is the result of millennia-long selective breeding and hybridization. Kingsbury traces the history of human attempts to make plants more reliable, productive, and nutritious—a story that owes as much to accident and error as to innovation and experiment.

 

Book Announcement: Disturbing Argument


Submitted by syntaxfactory on March 31, 2015 - 7:21pm


Disturbing Argument

Catherine Palczewski
Routledge, Jan 30, 2015 - 471 pages

 

Oh, Adjunct!


Submitted by syntaxfactory on March 26, 2015 - 10:56am


From http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/o-adjunct-my-adjunct?mbid=soc...

What I didn’t know at the time—and what I wouldn’t figure out for the better part of the next decade—was that Harvey was an adjunct. He didn’t tell us, and I didn’t know to ask. As an undergraduate, I never heard the term.

 

Advances in the History of Rhetoric, Volume 18, Issue 1, 2015 is now available


Submitted by syntaxfactory on March 26, 2015 - 10:21am


Advances in the History of Rhetoric, Volume 18, Issue 1, 2015 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

This new issue contains the following articles:

Articles
“I Took Up the Hymn-Book”: Rhetoric of Hymnody in Jarena Lee’s Call to Preach
Paul A. Minifee
Pages: 1-28
DOI: 10.1080/15362426.2014.954756

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Decorum: Quintilian’s Reflections on Rhetorical Humor
Don Waisanen
Pages: 29-52
DOI: 10.1080/15362426.2014.974767

Archaic Argument: Aristotle’s Rhetoric and the Problem of First Principles
John J. Jasso
Pages: 53-68

 

New Podcast: Rhetoricity


Submitted by syntaxfactory on March 26, 2015 - 10:04am


New Podcast: Rhetoricity

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/rhetoricity/id977847687?mt=2

From Eric Detweiler:
The new episode of Rhetoricity is here: "Small Talk: The Final Frontier."

 

Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers


Submitted by syntaxfactory on March 25, 2015 - 11:15am


Posted without comment. Comments, though, are sought.

Beall’s List:
Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers
This is a list of questionable, scholarly open-access publishers. We recommend that scholars read the available reviews, assessments and descriptions provided here, and then decide for themselves whether they want to submit articles, serve as editors or on editorial boards. The criteria for determining predatory publishers are here.